Human health

Overview

Right now, our human health project pipeline is focused on tackling some of the largest health challenges of our time – finding safe and effective treatments for multidrug resistant Gram negative and Gram positive bacterial infections.

Our target is to reduce the virulence capabilities of these bacteria. Whether by preventing the establishment and spread of infection, reducing the use of antibiotics or filling the gap in significant unmet clinical needs, we are doing our part to counter the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Lowering the burden of living with persistent infections and the financial cost of treating these infections goes hand-in-hand with reducing the impact and ongoing spread of antimicrobial resistance more broadly. Neem is using a novel approach to target the management of bacterial virulence factors as one of the drivers of these costly and hard-hitting healthcare challenges.

 

Neem Biotech website pipeline portfolio_June2019

Wound/ Dermatological


The prevalence and severity of chronically infected wounds are currently a considerable and unmet clinical need. This is set to rise in coming years as more of us live longer and the effects of chronic lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes and obesity take hold. Control of infection in these wounds will be key if we are to create conditions that allow wounds to heal as quickly as possible and with minimal infection-related complications. These conditions remain clinically elusive.

Neem’s portfolio of wound interventions is multifaceted. It includes development of novel pharmaceuticals that target anti-virulence capabilities as well as development of a highly targeted antiseptic delivery platform in the form of a controlled release patch. This programme has completed preclinical development and is ready to progress into clinical trials.   

The quorum sensing inhibition capabilities of our broad-spectrum candidate molecules minimise the development and spread of infection in wounds by reducing the activation and expression of virulence factors by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. This includes minimising the formation of biofilms in wounds and disrupting mature biofilms. Our lead candidate is currently in preclinical development.

 

Respiratory Infections

Quorum sensing inhibition provides a promising new approach to preventing the establishment of chronic lung infections in patients with respiratory indications such as cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, COPD and ventilator assisted pneumonia. Virulence factor expression and biofilms are key drivers of lung tissue damage and loss of lung function in these patients. These factors are directly related to severity of disease, hospitalisations and mortality in these patients.  

Disruption of communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria modulates key virulence factors. This minimises their ability to directly harm the surrounding bacterial epithelium, reduces formation of  biofilm that is crucial in protecting them from current anti-Pseudomonal antibiotics and enhances the efficacy of antibiotics administered.

The respiratory programme has progressed to a hit-to-lead stage.

 

Epidermolysis Bullosa

Epidermolysis Bullosa is a rare inherited disorder in which the skin is fragile and forms liquid-filled blisters at sites of rubbing. These blisters can become infected, causing emotional and physical distress to sufferers and reducing their ability to participate in day-to-day life. Standard-of-care management aims to treat the blisters and to prevent them from forming. There are currently no curative treatments.

Our molecule is showing promise in managing both blister formation and infection in relevant subtypes of this condition.

 

 

 

Human health

Overview

Right now, our human health project pipeline is focused on tackling some of the largest health challenges of our time – finding safe and effective treatments for multidrug resistant Gram negative and Gram positive bacterial infections.

Our target is to reduce the virulence capabilities of these bacteria. Whether by preventing the establishment and spread of infection, reducing the use of antibiotics or filling the gap in significant unmet clinical needs, we are doing our part to counter the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Lowering the burden of living with persistent infections and the financial cost of treating these infections goes hand-in-hand with reducing the impact and ongoing spread of antimicrobial resistance more broadly. Neem is using a novel approach to target the management of bacterial virulence factors as one of the drivers of these costly and hard-hitting healthcare challenges.

 

Neem Biotech website pipeline portfolio_June2019

Wound/ Dermatological


The prevalence and severity of chronically infected wounds are currently a considerable and unmet clinical need. This is set to rise in coming years as more of us live longer and the effects of chronic lifestyle-related diseases such as diabetes and obesity take hold. Control of infection in these wounds will be key if we are to create conditions that allow wounds to heal as quickly as possible and with minimal infection-related complications. These conditions remain clinically elusive.

Neem’s portfolio of wound interventions is multifaceted. It includes development of novel pharmaceuticals that target anti-virulence capabilities as well as development of a highly targeted antiseptic delivery platform in the form of a controlled release patch. This programme has completed preclinical development and is ready to progress into clinical trials.   

The quorum sensing inhibition capabilities of our broad-spectrum candidate molecules minimise the development and spread of infection in wounds by reducing the activation and expression of virulence factors by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. This includes minimising the formation of biofilms in wounds and disrupting mature biofilms. Our lead candidate is currently in preclinical development.

 

Respiratory Infections

Quorum sensing inhibition provides a promising new approach to preventing the establishment of chronic lung infections in patients with respiratory indications such as cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, COPD and ventilator assisted pneumonia. Virulence factor expression and biofilms are key drivers of lung tissue damage and loss of lung function in these patients. These factors are directly related to severity of disease, hospitalisations and mortality in these patients.  

Disruption of communication between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria modulates key virulence factors. This minimises their ability to directly harm the surrounding bacterial epithelium, reduces formation of  biofilm that is crucial in protecting them from current anti-Pseudomonal antibiotics and enhances the efficacy of antibiotics administered.

The respiratory programme has progressed to a hit-to-lead stage.

 

Epidermolysis Bullosa

Epidermolysis Bullosa is a rare inherited disorder in which the skin is fragile and forms liquid-filled blisters at sites of rubbing. These blisters can become infected, causing emotional and physical distress to sufferers and reducing their ability to participate in day-to-day life. Standard-of-care management aims to treat the blisters and to prevent them from forming. There are currently no curative treatments.

Our molecule is showing promise in managing both blister formation and infection in relevant subtypes of this condition.